If you are a resident of Texas and have been accused of committing a crime, it is difficult to know what you can and cannot do while you wait for your sentencing or trial. In today’s world, it is all too easy to connect with the world through phones and other tablets that are constantly in your hands. While you are updating your Facebook, Instagram or other social media page, is the content going to affect how you are viewed during your trial and can it be used against you in court?

According to Forbes Magazine, today’s courts are happy to admit evidence in the form of social media content to be used against you. For example, if you claim you do not know someone who was involved in the crime, but you post pictures on social media of the two of you together, this information can be used to prove you are lying.

If the information is obtained from a public social media post, it is not considered illegally obtained evidence. Even using a messenger app to send self-incriminating messages with another person privately may be admitted to the courts. Although you may panic during a trial or lawsuit, it is not a good idea to delete content from your social media. If the content is used as evidence and treated as such, it may be a serious offense to delete it.

There are ways to protect yourself from social media content that is incriminating. Be selective about what you share with the world and only post stuff that you would tell anyone in a public place. You may want to invest in a service to protect your online activities from censorship, interference and snooping. Finally, always be careful what links you click. Dangerous links and risky apps are often sent through social media and give hackers the information needed to spy on you.

This information is for educational purposes and should not be interpreted as legal advice.